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Thread: New guy, getting started

  1. #1

    Default New guy, getting started

    Hello everyone and greetings from Finland. I'm new to this hobby and advice are welcome. I dont know much about amateur radio, and my first question is; how good is yaesu ft-450d to start with? I'm looking for a long-term equipment, and I'd like to hear your opinion. Thanks!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    58

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    Hi, Spreelock; welcome to the hobby.

    I have this radio, and it was my first HF rig. The variety of radios was so bemusing, I just wanted something to get started. It turns out that this radio does most things that I could ever need. You could spend 4x as much money, but this will do for many years. It has a built in ATU, which will match many aerials.

    Have a look at the reviews on eHam:

    https://www.eham.net/reviews/view-product?id=9529

    Thanks,

    Chris
    UK

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Gillingham, Kent, UK
    Posts
    366

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    The FT-450D was designed with new hams in mind. It's literally the perfect HF starter.

    It's a keeper.
    MB6IGK Fusion WiRES-X Digital Gateway on 434.5125 MHz in Gillingham, Kent, UK

  4. #4

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    Hey, thanks for the reply. I checked the reviews, and it seems a good start. Though, i'm not sure about getting external tuner or antenna..

  5. #5
    gnuuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    NW Pa,USA
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    101

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    external tuners often work well and actually you can build them quite easily.
    some from kits are compact and with care are fairly easy to assemble.
    or you can get a list of components and build them from scratch, I have a chinese kit tuner and built it and it works fine.
    but due to its size it only has bnc connectors. It is a t circuit tuner.
    I also built an L tuner from scratch ( with both bnc and pl259 )
    its not necessary to purchase one but you can if you want to. to me its more satisfying to build them.:
    too much blood in my caffeine system.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Gillingham, Kent, UK
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    366

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spreelock View Post
    Hey, thanks for the reply. I checked the reviews, and it seems a good start. Though, i'm not sure about getting external tuner or antenna..
    It all depends on your operating conditions.

    If you have the room, make an antenna that is resonant on the frequency or frequencies you wish to use. This just takes space, a bit of time, and lots of wire.

    If you have to compromise on antennas due to space restrictions or because you don't want your backyard to look like a spaghetti factory, then think about using an antenna matcher ( "tuner" ) to enable you to work frequencies that your antenna isn't designed to work on.

    Just remember, an antenna tuner doesn't tune an antenna, it just matches a 50 ohm impedance, so that way your radio doesn't fry itself with reflected power. A poor signal is better than no signal, but it's going to be poorer than an antenna built for the frequency.
    MB6IGK Fusion WiRES-X Digital Gateway on 434.5125 MHz in Gillingham, Kent, UK

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2E0JTP View Post
    It all depends on your operating conditions.
    Well, I live in an apartment, so i'll have no luxury of building any huge setup. I was about to use it as a table rig from home, and as a mobile rig for hunting group. I've got no clue on performing at these conditions.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Gillingham, Kent, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spreelock View Post
    Well, I live in an apartment, so i'll have no luxury of building any huge setup. I was about to use it as a table rig from home, and as a mobile rig for hunting group. I've got no clue on performing at these conditions.
    Depending on the type of apartment you live in, and what floor you live on, this can be a very difficult situation to operate HF. Experienced hams will often have trouble doing anything HF whatsoever in an apartment. Even a 10m dipole in the apartment can cause issues with neighbours electrical equipment, and a mag loop is no simple or cheap proposition. You might want to think about setting up a station while 'portable', a bit of parks on the air, or perhaps camping combined with ham radio works for many. A mobile set up can work quite well, and no, you don't have to drive down the road with a 30ft antenna on your car. You can buy or make portable masts that you can throw in the back of the car and erect when you get to your site. An antenna is just wire. It coils up and can be carried very easily.

    The thing is, antennas want to be out in free space. Away from anything that would impinge on their radiation pattern. At HF frequencies, this is no small distance. VHF and UHF is a much simpler proposition for apartment use, if you have local repeaters that always helps, and now of course, we have Fusion, D-Star, DMR, Echolink, AllStar and other forms of internet linking radio systems, so all is not lost. Even if you live in the basement.
    MB6IGK Fusion WiRES-X Digital Gateway on 434.5125 MHz in Gillingham, Kent, UK

  9. #9

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    Welcome from UK

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