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Thread: Perfect Straight-Key Morse Code: Myth?

  1. #1

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    Default Perfect Straight-Key Morse Code: Myth?

    What is the proper (and most efficient) technique for creating Morse code by hand, using a manual Morse code key?

    Ham radio operators find Morse code (and the CW mode, or Continuous Wave keying mode) very useful, even though Morse code is no longer required as part of the licensing process.

    Morse code is highly effective in weak-signal radio work. And, Preppers love Morse code because it is the most efficient way to communicate when there is a major disaster that could wipe out the communications infrastructure.

    While this military film is antique, the vintage information is timeless, as the material is applicable to Morse code, even today.



    The International Morse Code (sometimes referred to as CW in amateur radio jargon because a continuous wave is turned on and off with the long and short elements of the Morse code characters) is a type of character encoding that transmits telegraphic information using rhythm. Morse code uses a standardized sequence of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a given message. The short and long elements can be formed by sounds, marks, or pulses, in on off keying and are commonly known as dots and dashes or, dits and dahs. The speed of Morse code is measured in words per minute (WPM) or characters per minute, while fixed-length data forms of telecommunication transmission are usually measured in baud or bps.

    Why is it called Morse code? This character encoding was devised by Samuel F. B. Morse, the creator of the electric telegraph. This Morse code came in two flavors, in the beginning years of its usage. One was in use by the railroads of America, and is known as American Morse Code. And, there is a unified, internationally-used version (adopted by radio operators), now known as the International Morse Code. Now, when most people refer to Morse code, or CW, they mean, International Morse Code.

    Currently, the most popular use of Morse code is by amateur radio operators, although it is no longer a requirement for amateur licensing in many countries. In the professional field, pilots and air traffic controllers are usually familiar with Morse code and require a basic understanding. Navigational aids in the field of aviation, such as VORs and NDBs, constantly transmit their identity in Morse code.

    Morse code is designed to be read by humans without a decoding device, making it useful for sending automated digital data in voice channels. For emergency signaling, Morse code can be sent by way of improvised sources that can be easily keyed on and off, making Morse code one of the most versatile methods of telecommunication in existence.

    More about Morse code, at my website: http://cw.hfradio.org


    73 de NW7US dit dit

  2. #2
    gnuuser's Avatar
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    Apr 2020
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    Default

    that was a very informative and funny video!
    perfect morse with a straight key or bug or paddles is never perfect because timing differences between operators.
    you could be sending at 15wpm and the other guy at 18 wpm. still readable by both but never the same.
    computerized sending and receiving between synchronized computers comes close to it but due to atmospheric conditions there will always be a slight variance detected (maybe not by human ears though)

    and thank you for the link!
    Last edited by gnuuser; Tue 5th Jan 2021 at 02:26.
    Im so old dirt was my apprentice

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