Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Help identify Mast

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Lincoln
    Posts
    2

    Arrow Help identify Mast

    I am needing help with identifying the mast manufacture in attachments. Require line of sight to obtain internet access and purchased a used 50ft telescoping mast. I know many advise to never use an old mast. Yet, this unit is in very good condition. No rust except the winch will need replaced. Plan to replace the winch. I am sharing some pictures in hopes someone can advise who made this mast? Any other information that may apply is welcome.
    Thx!
    Ken



    https://www.dropbox.com/s/zovamssm9x...%20PM.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/tgst9u6854...%20PM.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/5ny2p7fh9e...%20PM.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/r55krdkzva...%20PM.jpg?dl=0
    Last edited by Jisake1; Wed 5th Aug 2020 at 01:19. Reason: Added a video as walkdown

  2. #2

    Default

    That looks like an old military mast I once had mounted on a trailer. You may never find the maker as they were contracted out.

  3. #3
    gnuuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    NW Pa,USA
    Posts
    67

    Default

    there is nothing wrong with using an old mast providing it is carefully inspected for damage and or stress marks.
    also providing it is properly guy wired for support.
    a telescoping mast is one thing you should never climb extended. that's only common sense
    while bare metal is more difficult to view stress marks they are easily recognizable( look for small kinks, tiny stretch marks, patches that look grainy around welds, or visible bends)
    painted or powder coated masts however are much easier to see the tiny defects by the visible tearing of the paint or coating.

    I live in a breezeway area and we get a lot of wind! my advice is adequate guy wiring with good solid bases is a must.

    many military masts were contracted out as was mentioned earlier, I have seen some made by GE on my last 2 ships but most navy ones were usually constructed in the SIMA shipyards.
    but these were fixed masts in sections bolted together.
    I believe the telescoping ones were probably used by the army. and I don't know where they had those made.

    unless my guess is off that appears to be a mobile tower! lightweight and collapsible and by the style of its construction was probably used in Vietnam era. straight bar construction! Later towers used a zigzag pattern for cross-members as it was much stronger.
    But It could also be an economy tower, cheaply made and highly portable.
    Last edited by gnuuser; Fri 21st Aug 2020 at 01:41.
    too much blood in my caffeine system.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Lincoln
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thanks for your advice. I will plan to install guy wires but not certain of tension. I read where some slack is needed and how professionals even have pulled a tower down at installation. Any advice in this area would be appreciated.
    I also had second thoughts regarding the lack of cross bracing, but have seen many towers with cross bracing fail on line. I only will have a small 5G receiver on the top, so not to concerned about load twisting. This was not used as a portable tower based on the base plate. Has a tilt down that was mounted next to a residence. Was a grandfather to the two brothers that sold it. (They intended to install but local city codes did't permit towers. Zoning. I have a wide open field so no concerns if did fail. Still, prefer to prevent that as well. Another forum identified as a Tristao in a 1976 cat. Feel that is best reference, as closest to the era and design.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •