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Thread: High voltage oil burner transformer

  1. #1

    Default High voltage oil burner transformer

    Completely non-radio related, but I thought I would probe the minds of the elders here.

    My electronics history starts at 5 years old with my first soldering iron burn on my foot. Many destroyed toys later, I was given a HUGE oil burner ignition transformer at the age of 16. This thing was the size of two paint cans stacked on top of each other, 110v input, 3 inch arc output, and had a beautiful hammered green finish with ceramic insulators on top with contacts very similar to automotive spark plug tops in the recessed ceramic. Anyhow, after several Jacob's Ladders and a shift toward microwave transformers, someone decided to make it vanish (likely for the better, even though I knew to keep one hand in my pocket back then ~ but I still should have been dead many times!). Countless years later, nobody seems to know where it went (or that I even had it) and I cannot find any photo even close to it online. Does such a ridiculously large transformer ring a bell to anyone? I'd love to have another just like it but can only find small square ones. This thing resembled a power pole transformer, but roughly 1/4 the size.

    Thanks! KE0KOY

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    INDIANA
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    Default

    Is this similar to what youíre looking for?

    https://www.gordonelectricsupply.com...SABEgL8BfD_BwE
    73s, God bless and good day. KD9KVS
    I have a brain injury.
    I am not my brain injury.
    This does not define me.

  3. #3

    Default

    No. Im thinking the one i had was from the 60's. It might have been a Westinghouse because when i see the color and the labels on their motors, something about it stands out. It was a cylindrical housing with a radius'd bottom edge. The top had a slight lip to it and it had smooth dark colored (perhaps black) insulators protruding from the top, one off centered. The finish was finely hammered texture dark green paint. If i had to guess, it weighed roughly 20 pounds.

  4. #4

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    From your description this seems like what youíre referencing. This is obviously a cut away, but is a single phase transformer.
    73s, God bless and good day. KD9KVS
    I have a brain injury.
    I am not my brain injury.
    This does not define me.

  5. #5

    Default

    Close, but not quite. Ill fire up solidworks and create a 3D part from memory and get it posted. Shouldnt take long.

  6. #6

    Default

    transformer.jpg

    I forgot to add the screw heads on the electrical cord plate and there are two metal ears on the top surface for bolting it into the side of the furnace, but this looks very close to what it was.

  7. #7

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    Apr 2019
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    INDIANA
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    Good job on that! Iíve not seen any, but whenever I log in and see this conversation I look again. One day Iíll find it.
    73s, God bless and good day. KD9KVS
    I have a brain injury.
    I am not my brain injury.
    This does not define me.

  8. #8

    Default

    Many thanks! I remember a scratch in the black finish on the top of one if the insulators looked brown so maybe the top was bakelite. Hopefully you happen to cross paths with one, I've spent years looking and will be very excited if I get my hands on another!

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    INDIANA
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    This is not what youíre looking for, but pretty awesome.
    73s, God bless and good day. KD9KVS
    I have a brain injury.
    I am not my brain injury.
    This does not define me.

  10. #10

    Default

    That does look awesome. Ive used automotive ignition coils and microwave transformers before. I used to drive 12v ignition coils using 120v mains with a triac dimmer switch in series. On low, the dimmer sends short pulses with sinusoidal rising edges and square falling edges and really makes those coils shine! There was a large capacitor in that setup too, fried my share of dimmers! Not saying it was smart to do, but it sure worked good! Another favorite of mine was a "wooden box with strange connections" the science teacher had in a display case and gave to a friend when the school was rebuilt, she didnt know what it was. It ended up in my possession and disappeared about the same time as the green one. Anyhow, i had fidured it out. Turns out, the funny looking hardware sticking out of the resin-filled box were dc input, hv output and the mechanism in the middle was the relay contacts. The smile on my face when 12vdc made 6 inch arcs was surely priceless!
    Last edited by brandon lind; Tue 4th Aug 2020 at 00:48.

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