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Thread: WTF Does this mean?

  1. #1

    Question WTF Does this mean?

    I'm definitely a noob... I have a Yaesu FT-8800 that was given to me. I was reading the manual and saw this. All I can figure is the left and right frequencies shouldn't be too close to each other??

    I haven't done this type of math in many years.


  2. #2
    Super Moderator 2E0FVL's Avatar
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    I have an FT-8800 and have a fair mix of frequencies on left and right never had a problem.
    Pete - 2EFVL
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by rick619 View Post
    I'm definitely a noob... I have a Yaesu FT-8800 that was given to me. I was reading the manual and saw this. All I can figure is the left and right frequencies shouldn't be too close to each other??

    I haven't done this type of math in many years.

    And saw what?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by K6CPO View Post
    And saw what?
    The screenshot didn't attach. I'll try to post it again tonight.

    I haven't needed an image hosting site in years. What site do people on here use?

  5. #5

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    Yaesu FT 8800 is a dual band radio. Designed to operate on amateur radio frequencies.

    Both sides of the transceiver scans independently on either band. It can scan 2 meters or 70 cm simultaneously.

    If you are transmitting on either band and the opposite side of the transceiver is in the same band it will mute the other half of the radio until you stop transmitting to protect the front end of the other side.

    The best programming software i've found is G4HFQ. You can purchase a programming cable online for about $15.00

    The Yaesu programming doesn't work very well and doesn't allow you many editing options.

    The Chirp stuff is an entry level software program - WYSWYG.

    The FT 8900 R is a 4 band FM only radio, will receive aircraft bands on AM, will not transmit below 28 Mhz.

    One side does 3 bands, the other side does 3 bands, I think, and it will cross band repeat - but its illegal to cross band repeat in the USA unless you have a control operator at the control point - licensed amateur, and unless you ID on both the input and output frequencies - which the radio cannot do by itself. On the 8900R you can receive on 70cm or 6m or 10m while transmitting on 2 meters or 70 cm as long as you are not monitoring on the same band as you are transmitting on. It also puts out about 1 watt on 900 mhz.

  6. #6

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    The 8800R should be able to save frequencies / PL's in banks.

    Say you live in Western Pennsylvania and you want to travel to Eastern PA or New York state or OHIO, you can program the radio with separate repeaters in each bank and when you cross the line and go out of range of one set of repeaters you can switch banks and open the other programming with the different PL's and operate on those repeaters without having to manually edit the frequencies / PL's.
    You can also choose to monitor by name as well as by frequency on the display.

    The Yaesu is quality compared to the TNT style radios which is crap. You get a much better front end and a more durable final transistor with fold back. You should thank the person that GAVE you that radio, its worth at least $250.00

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by R2D2 View Post
    Yaesu FT 8800 is a dual band radio. Designed to operate on amateur radio frequencies.

    Both sides of the transceiver scans independently on either band. It can scan 2 meters or 70 cm simultaneously.

    If you are transmitting on either band and the opposite side of the transceiver is in the same band it will mute the other half of the radio until you stop transmitting to protect the front end of the other side.

    The best programming software i've found is G4HFQ. You can purchase a programming cable online for about $15.00

    The Yaesu programming doesn't work very well and doesn't allow you many editing options.

    The Chirp stuff is an entry level software program - WYSWYG.

    The FT 8900 R is a 4 band FM only radio, will receive aircraft bands on AM, will not transmit below 28 Mhz.

    One side does 3 bands, the other side does 3 bands, I think, and it will cross band repeat - but its illegal to cross band repeat in the USA unless you have a control operator at the control point - licensed amateur, and unless you ID on both the input and output frequencies - which the radio cannot do by itself. On the 8900R you can receive on 70cm or 6m or 10m while transmitting on 2 meters or 70 cm as long as you are not monitoring on the same band as you are transmitting on. It also puts out about 1 watt on 900 mhz.
    I've been using Chirp and have the cable. Mostly using it to add in repeaters of areas I will be.

    I was definitely appreciative of being given the radio. Seems like exactly what I need without being too fancy.

    The screenshot of the manual I was trying to post is the notice at the bottom of page 23. Don't think I can post attachments because it's a new account. I was just trying to understand the gist of the notice. Something about frequency mix and an equation.

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