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Thread: boafeng uv 9r

  1. #1
    gnuuser's Avatar
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    Default boafeng uv 9r

    I purchased the uv9r and monitored a few stations, I haven't transmitted because i haven't got the license yet But Im excited to get it going.
    Im joining our local club and ares organization to provide emergency communication.
    Ive heard a lot of poor reviews about the chinese radios. from many people. (mostly those who have a lot more money to burn than I do).
    and its been mostly about noisy reception but a lot of that can be corrected with a good matched antenna.
    For the most part if this radio with a decent antenna can be sending and receiving over more than our county area then it is a good investment.
    Its mostly going to be used for mobile setup with my 40 meter qrp as backup.

    I know i can purchase better radios But I would rather build them.

  2. #2
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    every review Ive read and heard slams the radio and often the people who buy them.
    Yes its an entry level radio and no not everyone is a cheapskate!

    what should i buy? spend a lot of money for a radio or pay for the medication my health issues require?
    spend money on a good name brand or buy food?

    people will pay for what they can afford and sometimes maybe save up a little.
    when you get the trolls who belittle others for their choices they drive people away.
    and often dissuade people from becoming licensed in the first place by telling them if they cant afford to buy the good stuff then they don't deserve to get a license.

    This has not happened here or on some of the other ham radio sites Ive been to, But I do hear it from some turds who claim ham is not a rich mans game!
    no its not but any good gear is quite often out of reach to justify spending the money on something that only 1 person can use!
    Just ask any person with kids what comes first!

    Its a learning experience!
    Not a brag hobby where your only concern is contesting totals and definitely not bragging about having the biggest and best.

    I enjoy talking with people who have built antennas, and tested them (and all the better those who post their results of tests)
    and those of you who go out of your way to help someone with their projects

    I think its one good reason i like this site there are so many elmers here ( probably some younger than I am)
    too much blood in my caffeine system.

  3. #3

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    There used to be a user here that was very opinionated about "walkie talkies" but he is no longer here. Bottom line is simple. If you feel that you got your moneys worth out of it, you got a good deal. Those radios work. They may not be the most spectrally pure or have the easiest menu navigation, but they get you on the air. Many people that want to get into this hobby are turned away by the misconception that it needs to be an expensive hobby. It doesn't need to be expensive at all. Starting with a cheap radio is the best way to go for many. Just don't stop at the cheap radio. When you can, upgrade. For example, my baofeng UV-5R was great, but then I got a yaesu FT1XD ($325 more). Big difference. Then I stumbled upon an old box that had an old pair of Kenwoods (a TK-705D and TK-805D). I've mentioned before about how I feel about those radios

    Everyone has opinions and everyone has their favorite brand. As long as you don't have other hams or neighbors telling you that your equipment is an interference issue, enjoyment is the only other requirement. Investment comes later as you gain interest in the hobby

  4. #4
    gnuuser's Avatar
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    I definitely intend to get a better radio when i can But the only reason i chose this in the first place is that it will be used for emergency when I'm on the road.

    my choice however is to build my own equipment if I can find some good kits or pick up a used radio and modify and improve it.
    so far I am really enjoying kit building as its good therapy.
    too much blood in my caffeine system.

  5. #5

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    Nuts and Volts magazine has a seven part .pdf called the Bipolar Transistor Cookbook. It has a bunch of useful circuits including transmitters. Every component is explained and each new section adds to the last in a well written way. I made my first single transistor AM/FM transmitter using that cookbook.

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