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Thread: HELLO FROM. CHICO, CA

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Chico, CA
    Posts
    1

    Default HELLO FROM. CHICO, CA

    Paul here N6PAS an old person but a young ham. Ben licensed about 1 1/2 years. Circumstances currently keep me from much DX activity but love it when I can. I Monitor 146.52 most of the time along with several local repeaters.
    I have a couple of desires involving HAM radio. 1. I am encouraging ALL the younger people I meet to get interested in this hobby and 2. I want to get YOU ALL to use and monitor 146.52 as much as possible. It is very disappointing when traveling to monitor and call and find no one. I truly believe this hobby would be better for us ALL, includning non-hams if the calling frequency was used regularly.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Ash Fork, Arizona
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    Martin here K7MEM, an old person and a old ham. Been licensed 55 years (since 1965). Mostly I operate CW on the low bands.

    Personally, I haven't been on 2 Meters in over 50 years. 50 years ago it was a very different place. It was the early days of using 2 Meter FM. There were no repeaters and very little FM activity. But the low end, 144-146 MHz was very busy with AM. I ran with a Heathkit Twoer (5 Watts) and a Lafayette HE-30 receiver, with a 2 Meter converter. I was very young and very poor, so I could only afford one crystal (8.110 MHz x 18 = 145.98 MHz). But I didn't let that stop me. I had a fabulous time on the radio. Many of the hams on 2 Meters were youngsters, like me, so I made a lot of new friends.

    But that was a time when computers were a new thing and cell phones and the internet didn't exist. It's hard to get young people interested in monitoring a single frequency waiting for someone to say "radio check". They will be bored in a micro second. Amateur Radio has many facets. This make it difficult to express to the younger crowd, how diverse and interesting it can be.

    I'm not saying don't encourage them. But you have to come up with something a bit more interesting. The big fascination today is combining computers and radios and using them for the new digital modes. I know that I have been using computers and radios together for 40 years, for various things. But now there are modes like PSK-31 and of course FT-8. While there is some VHF/UHF activity with those modes, the bulk of the operating happens on the low bands. PSK-31 is getting a little old hat, like RTTY and SSTV, but with FT-8, you pretty much teach your radio/computer combination to find stations and make contacts, all by itself. Then you can sit back, relax, and watch the fun.

    Actually, I don't run FT-8. I don't find the point of it. But many hams like it and that is their prerogative.

    Young people need to be told about the diversity of Amateur Radio, not just one little facit. But I'll be darned if I know how to do that. Maybe someone else has ideas.
    Martin, K7MEM
    http://www.k7mem.com
    Ash Fork, AZ - 60 miles from the Grand Canyon on Rt-66. Elevation 5,300 ft.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Idaho Panhandle
    Posts
    14

    Default Hello!

    Quote Originally Posted by Paulinbaja View Post
    Paul here N6PAS an old person but a young ham. Ben licensed about 1 1/2 years. Circumstances currently keep me from much DX activity but love it when I can. I Monitor 146.52 most of the time along with several local repeaters.
    I have a couple of desires involving HAM radio. 1. I am encouraging ALL the younger people I meet to get interested in this hobby and 2. I want to get YOU ALL to use and monitor 146.52 as much as possible. It is very disappointing when traveling to monitor and call and find no one. I truly believe this hobby would be better for us ALL, includning non-hams if the calling frequency was used regularly.
    That sounds familiar. Am also old and new. I've listened to a couple receivers I've had for years. Traffic has been scarce. Began thinking it was just me. Was listening in Sonora, CA and Placerville, CA. Now in North Idaho Panhandle. Our local Bonner County Amateur Radio Club frequency is 146.78. Have not heard a thing on it. I missed their Sunday, 7pm meetup. Maybe next time.

    Welcome,
    jjconstr

  4. #4

    Default

    Hi from UK Paul.
    You never mentioned HF so assume you have a tech license. The first level in UK is the "novice". But in UK you can use any ham frequencies, HF included on any license. They just restrict your power to 10w.

    They have just started doing online exams for the novice license in UK. I have no idea if you need to be a UK resident to sit that test. If you were to pass the UK test l doubt that you would be allowed to use it in the states. I think they only recognise the UK full license. Same as extra in USA. If you have a USA extra you can apply for a UK full license. Does that work the other way round? I don't know but assume it must. Perhaps l should apply for one to find out. But l suspect that l would need a USA address in order to apply as if l was just a visitor l could use my UK license.

    There was much more activity on VHF/UHF before the days of cell phones. When that technology came into the game repeater activity fell over here.

    Like Martin says, we need to attract more youngsters into radio.
    You will find more activity when you move onto HF.
    Now that we are all locked down it's an opportunity to play with radios. After l tidy up the garden for the wife l will move onto my workshop. I haven't decided whether to set up a station in the workshop or in the house.

    So we hope to hear your voice coming across the Atlantic at some point.

    Stay safe
    Jim

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