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Thread: ID-4100A Having issues Transmitting

  1. #1

    Default ID-4100A Having issues Transmitting

    Hello, Iím brand new to HAM radios. I recently purchased a ID-4100A to use in my truck for off-roading. While on a recent trip to Baja Mexico, I was unable to transmit on station 151.625 among others. I was getting an error on the screen saying ďout of bandĒ. I was able to receive crystal clear, but could not transmit. Iíve tried doing some research online, but conking youíre short on an answer. Anyone have an idea on what the issue might be? Iím suspecting I might need to program the radio somehow, but not sure. Again, total newbie here if you canít tell.

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    -Mike

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Ash Fork, Arizona
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Do you have a Mexican Amateur Radio license? Or a reciprocal license?

    If not, you should not be transmitting at all. Below is a quote:

    "Since 2014, the Mexican regulator IFT (sometimes called IFETEL) has not issued permits to foreign radio amateurs. ... At this point, the only legal way for a foreign ham to operate from Mexican territory would be to operate from a Mexican ham's station, using that ham's call sign."

    The USA version of the IC-4100A, will receive 118 ~ 174 MHz but will only transmit on 144 ~ 148 MHz. It will also receive 230 ~ 550 MHz but only transmit on 430 ~ 450 MHz. Those transmit frequencies are the only frequencies that you are allowed to transmit on, with a US Amateur Radio license.

    It is possible to "open up" the radio so that it will transmit out of band. See ID-4100 Wideband TX Modification. However, if you are not skilled at working with surface mount circuitry, I do not recommend it. You shouldn't be transmitting out of band any way.
    Martin, K7MEM
    http://www.k7mem.com
    Ash Fork, AZ - 60 miles from the Grand Canyon on Rt-66. Elevation 5,300 ft.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by k7mem View Post
    Do you have a Mexican Amateur Radio license? Or a reciprocal license?

    If not, you should not be transmitting at all. Below is a quote:

    "Since 2014, the Mexican regulator IFT (sometimes called IFETEL) has not issued permits to foreign radio amateurs. ... At this point, the only legal way for a foreign ham to operate from Mexican territory would be to operate from a Mexican ham's station, using that ham's call sign."

    The USA version of the IC-4100A, will receive 118 ~ 174 MHz but will only transmit on 144 ~ 148 MHz. It will also receive 230 ~ 550 MHz but only transmit on 430 ~ 450 MHz. Those transmit frequencies are the only frequencies that you are allowed to transmit on, with a US Amateur Radio license.

    It is possible to "open up" the radio so that it will transmit out of band. See ID-4100 Wideband TX Modification. However, if you are not skilled at working with surface mount circuitry, I do not recommend it. You shouldn't be transmitting out of band any way.

    Thanks for the info, no I do not have a Mexican armature radio licenses. I do have some experience in surface mount circuitry, so I might give this modification a try. I only plan to use my radio in remote locations where there is no radio traffic. Hopefully this works. All of the other guys in my latest group had working radios without modification. Not sure why I need to modify this one?

    Thanks again for the info.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by k7mem View Post
    Do you have a Mexican Amateur Radio license? Or a reciprocal license?

    If not, you should not be transmitting at all. Below is a quote:

    "Since 2014, the Mexican regulator IFT (sometimes called IFETEL) has not issued permits to foreign radio amateurs. ... At this point, the only legal way for a foreign ham to operate from Mexican territory would be to operate from a Mexican ham's station, using that ham's call sign."

    The USA version of the IC-4100A, will receive 118 ~ 174 MHz but will only transmit on 144 ~ 148 MHz. It will also receive 230 ~ 550 MHz but only transmit on 430 ~ 450 MHz. Those transmit frequencies are the only frequencies that you are allowed to transmit on, with a US Amateur Radio license.

    It is possible to "open up" the radio so that it will transmit out of band. See ID-4100 Wideband TX Modification. However, if you are not skilled at working with surface mount circuitry, I do not recommend it. You shouldn't be transmitting out of band any way.
    Thanks for the info @k7mem, Iíll give this modification a shot. I was just with a group of 10 rigs and nobody in my group had to modify their radios in order to work. Iím not sure why this is a requirement for my icom? Hopefully this mod works or else, Iíll likely just sell the unit and get one of the other brands that the guys in the group had.

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