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Thread: Amateur Rookie

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    3

    Default Amateur Rookie

    Good day, everyone. I am brand new to all of this having received my Tech ticket back in November. Honestly, I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing and have yet to even key up a radio. I'm currently working on setting up a mobile rig as that will be my primary rig. I don't think the apartment management would appreciate antennas going up around my building. The rig will have 1 mobile (Kenwood TM281) and 2 HTs (Yaesu FT65 and AnyTone DV878 UV) that I can easily take inside and use if needed. I have replaced the rubber ducks with Diamond SRJ77CAs which has helped with receiving at least. One major issue I have is programming the radios. I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing there so hopefully I can get with one of the guys from the local club soon to help me with that. I'm also still working on mounting options as I just don't have a lot of room to work with in my truck but hopefully I'll get that sorted out soon also. I look forward to finally getting things set up and operational so I can actually start using the gear. 73s to all.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Ash Fork, Arizona
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KI5HBU View Post
    73s to all.
    Well, here is your first lesson. "73" is not plural. "73" is an old telegraph code that means "best regards", or something to that effect. It doesn't need to be pluralized. The same is true with the other numeric codes.

    Anyway, you have some good radios. I have several Kenwood 2M/70CM radios myself. I even have one for 220. It would be a benefit to contact a local amateur radio club. Often clubs have their own repeaters and can instruct you on how to program your radios and on the normal conventions for making contacts. I started out on 2 Meters (1967). It was a very different place then. Repeaters and FM were brand new. But I had a great time using my 5 Watt, AM, Heathkit Twoer. Those were fun times.

    I would also recommend that you go back and test for the General or Extra license. They are really not that hard and they will open up all of the HF bands to you. That will open up the rest of the world to you. If you go to QRZ.com, they have sample tests that you can take. Once you start scoring 90 percent on the sample tests, your ready for the real thing. Other sites have similar tests, but I don't remember them right now. A club may help you with upgrading. Often they run classes and test sessions to get you upgraded.

    You might even consider learning Morse Code. Even though it is no longer required, there are a lot of new hams (Another lesson, note that "ham" is not capitalized) that are learning Morse Code, just for fun. When I got my license, Morse Code was required. But now, there is no longer any pressure to learn. Just don't expect miracles. Sending and receiving Morse Code correctly, takes time. Sometimes month, sometimes years.

    Be careful about using your radio mobile. In many states, there are very strict laws pertaining to the use of a cell phone or two way radio, while driving. A radio is as much of a distraction as cell phones. It is often possible to make your radio "hands free", just like a cell phone.

    I use to have a 10 Meter radio in my car. I made a lot of cross country contacts while driving, but I found it very distracting. It didn't help that my car had a 5-speed stick shift. I never knew when to grab the mike or stick shift.
    Martin, K7MEM
    http://www.k7mem.com
    Ash Fork, AZ - 60 miles from the Grand Canyon on Rt-66. Elevation 5,300 ft.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thanks for the info. I've seen the 73 done both ways even tho it isn't necessary to have it plural.

    I'm in the local club and they've been very helpful and encouraging. I've gotten codeplugs for the 878 from a couple of them. I just have to figure out how to set it up. I've had no such luck with the FT65 because no one else locally has one. I have a few things manually in but haven't had a chance to check it out yet. As for the Kenwood, Hopefully someone will have something useful to help me set it up once i can get it installed.

    I would eventually like to get my general but I'm not ready for that yet. I'm still trying to get things set up so I can even put the tech to use which i hope to do soon before tornado season kicks off in the Deep South in full affect. I've found some general classes on YouTube that I have saved for future use. As for Morse Code, I have no interest in fooling with that. I'm confused enough as it is. That's what kept me from doing this in the 80s so I opted for CB at that time. Since then I've made a career out of talking on radios dispatching police, fire and medical services.

    I unfortunately don't do much out of state traveling so that's not a big concern. I can use my phone handsfree and I think I can somehow set the 878 to do that same. I have to look into that more but I've heard that's a thing.

    Right now, I just want to get this stuff I have set up, installed in my truck and ready to go so I can actually start using it. It's been one hurdle after another so far but hopefully that will all come together soon.

    73,
    Chuck

  4. #4

    Default

    In order to program the AT-D878, go here:

    https://www.bridgecomsystems.com/pag...oad-a-codeplug

    and pick up the Mississippi state code plug and look up programming on the unit here:

    http://papasys.com/attachments/DMR_C...e_20190203.pdf

    I have the AT-D878UV-bt and it is a really nice unit. You can also get the Contact Manager to get the CSV file of all of the DMR contacts -- then you know who you are talking to on DMR.

    Have fun with the hobby!

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