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Thread: Hi

  1. #1

    Default Hi

    Very interested in getting into ham radio, joining to soak up some knowledge and ask some questions. Have not gotten my license yet. From Grantsboro, NC. I hope to get my son interested as he gets older.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

  2. #2

    Default

    Hi from UK.

    Hope you found the information that you required.
    Online exams are now available. Start with the Tech exam. Unsure what the age limits are for sitting those exams your side of the pond. But worth looking into as your son may be old enough to sit that online exam. The Tech exam is not too difficult so worth having a look at the content.

    Best of luck
    Jim

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Ash Fork, Arizona
    Posts
    88

    Default

    AFIK, there is no age limit on the Amateur Radio Test. As long as you can read the test your good to go. I got my first license when I was 16 (1965). There have been many cases of youngsters as young as 10 getting their licenses. Here is a link to a QRZ.com post by a ham that passed his license test when he was 6 years old.

    If you go to QRZ.com, you can check out the question pools for all of the license classes. You can also take practice exams. When you start to score 90% on the sample tests, it time to go take the real test.

    If you don't find the Technician test too difficult, I suggest that you take a look at the General Class exam. It is not uncommon these days to take the Technician, General, and Extra class license tests in a single test session. There is a wide variety of study material on the internet.
    Martin, K7MEM
    http://www.k7mem.com
    Ash Fork, AZ - 60 miles from the Grand Canyon on Rt-66. Elevation 5,300 ft.

  4. #4

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    The first time I took my test (arrogant and unstudied), I failed miserably. The 12 year old next to me passed (that = serious motivation). I thought kerchunking a distant repeater and tuning a duplexer with a radioshack watt meter made me an expert, nope. STUDY STUDY STUDY!!!!!! When I retried the test ~10 years later with a few book bindings wore out, I passed the tech and general the same day with surprising ease and they urged me to take the extra too. I thought I was pushing my luck so I didn't. Some day I will give that a go! You are never too young, just hit those books together!!!

    The license study guides offered by the ARRL will get you there, but they do not satisfy those who need detailed answers to grasp a concept. Anyone can cover the basics, get licensed, and stop studying there ~ and that approach will lead to lots of frustration later. So, here is what I would suggest:

    Get a copy of the ARRL Handbook and ARRL Antenna book. Start by reading the glossaries and the first paragraphs of each chapter only before doing anything else. This will prime you for whats to come and give you an idea of where to look for topics in the event something in one chapter (that touches on another chapter) becomes confusing. You will immediately know where to start looking for the answers. You will undoubtedly end up referencing those two books for the rest of your life, and because nobody can retain and understand it all the first time, its best to lay the foundation and skim the topics your first round through them. Knowing where to look for whats confusing is the best weapon against becoming discouraged and overwhelmed. If you do not understand electronics or digital modes, its ok to skip those chapters and hit the interesting ones like propagation and antennas first (after my first suggestion, of course!). Now, you are not only primed for finding the confusing stuff hidden in the various chapters, but now you are hooked from the exciting topics that will push you further into them. And remember, nobody memorizes it all. The key to mastering this hobby isn't to memorize all the topics, its knowing where to find them!
    Last edited by brandon lind; Fri 8th May 2020 at 00:49.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Ash Fork, Arizona
    Posts
    88

    Default

    There are many factors that go into the taking and passing the license tests. And, there are many thought or approaches. I feel that real learning doesn't start, until after you get your license. I have had a ham license for 55 years, and I still learn something new every day. If you don't learn something new each day, you become stagnant and drift up to 75 Meters. Learning should be a continuing process.

    This isn't a problem today, but I always had trouble getting my Morse Code skills up to the testing standards. I listened to all the crap about reaching plateaus, and being stuck just below the required code speed. On and off I would would study letter groups or try to copy the ARRL code on the radio. None of that helped. Then I took a look at the actual Morse Code test. I thought, why was I studying 5 letter code groups, when the test consisted of a simulated QSO. I can do a QSO. So I created a series of practice sessions at odd speeds from 5 to 27 WPM. Each speed had 10 recordings for a total of 120 practice sessions. I put them on cassette tapes. While that was a "sign of the times", I now have all the practice QSOs on a little MP3 player. Two or three times a day I would listen to my tape for about 15 minutes. I started with 11 WPM and in no time I was copying at 15-17 WPM. I went right through that plateau that everyone was talking about, and never noticed it. So, when I went for the test, I took the Technician and General written test, and the 13 WPM code test, and passed every one.

    I already had a background in electronics, so I didn't fine the written tests difficult. I just read through question pools once and I was ready to go.

    That inspired me to continue towards the Extra. Had I failed at any of those tests, I might not have continued on. Two months later, I went back to the VE testing station. This time I was going for the Extra Class license. I first took the Advanced and Extra written tests and passed both. That was followed by the 20 WPM Morse Code test. For the code, I had continued using my study method and was copying at about 25 WPM. For me, the code test was a breeze. I passed with 100% copy. I answered the 10 questions on what was sent too, but that wasn't needed. The other hams testing with me (7 or 8 of them) were not so lucky, and failed the test. One guy was trying for the third time, but didn't make it.

    Again, I only read through the question pool once and didn't find anything very difficult to answer. The multiple choice answers tend to make that a bit easier. I am not advocating memorization. That isn't what I did. I can't even memorize my own phone number. But it was material that I was already familiar with.

    There is a lot of motivation in all this. Except for the Morse Code, my preparation wasn't the best, but it worked for me. Do whatever works for you.
    Martin, K7MEM
    http://www.k7mem.com
    Ash Fork, AZ - 60 miles from the Grand Canyon on Rt-66. Elevation 5,300 ft.

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