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Thread: Kenwood Rx1000

  1. #21
    K7KBN's Avatar
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    I'd guess the center conductor of the coax (not the center PIN of the coax) is/was crimped on.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  2. #22

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    I do not understand what you are saying. I am about grade school level on this subject.
    Don

  3. #23
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    The center conductor of a coaxial cable is called just that. It's not a pin. The male connector has a pin, where the center conductor of the coax normally goes through and gets soldered -- or maybe crimped.

    I don't have any pictures of the connector you have, but if there's nowhere for the center conductor to go, I'd think the center conductor of your RG-6 may have been crimped on rather than soldered.

    I mentioned crimping as an alternative to soldering earlier, but for each connector type/cable type combination you'd need a separate set of dies for crimping, and that gets expensive. AND, you can't crimp connectors that are designed to be soldered; you have to get the crimp-type connector.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  4. #24

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    Don - the centre pin of any connector MUST have a method to attach it to the centre conductor of the coax. Remember that the PL259 connector is now very old, and your RG6 cable is super modern, super slim and the centre conductor quite tiny, but that plug was designed to use coax cable that had a centre conductor made of multiple strands (usually 7) of wire about the same size as the single centre one you have - so the hole that is in the PL259's centre pin will be BIG. If it is not open, then probably it's filled with solder.

    One of the things about these plugs was that in most designs, the very end of the centre pin was open, and the centre unsoldered conductor was cut so it poked out! You then quickly soldered the very end, and then cut the protruding wire off. If you prepared the cable correctly, then looking in through the side hole you would see the braid, and could solder that.

    There were some versions where you soldered the centre conductor from the tip AFTER you screwed the cable in, because the rear end 'hole' had an internal tapered thread that gradually gripped the braid as you screwed it in. If you prepared it correctly the centre conductor would remain insulated up to the point where it entered the pin inside, preventing shorts.

    You will have problems putting on a PL259 connector to RG6 cable, as the two were never designed to be used together. Remember TV stuff is 75Ohm and comms stuff is 50Ohm. The centre conductor will be able to be soldered, but the foils screen and the thin fragile drain are going to be very tricky to terminate to the shell. Too much heat will melt the RG6 and short it out! RG6, with that single fragile conductor in the centre is quite breakable, so you will need to be very careful putting it on. RG58, RG8, RG213 are all quite suitable for putting PL259's on - and much tougher.

    Crimping is a very good and importantly, quick method of putting connectors on when you need to do hundreds, and special connectors are made that you use for this purpose. They're quite cheap, but the tool for putting them on is very expensive - think hundreds, maybe even 4 digits for some systems! Us mortals use solder.

    You need a fine flat tipped iron - probably 25W, or if you develop the technique, a 35W - but this needs more control, or you melt things if you take too long. If you can find old fashioned solder with higher lead content, use it - it's more friendly. Lead free solder isn't as easy to use.

    Maybe you could take a picture or two and host them somewhere so we could see your problem.

    Remember - the PL259 MUST have a hole in it, and you are doing a bodge, so it's not going to be perfect or easy.

  5. #25

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    Just wanted to let you guys know that I got my new PL259 connectors and they work just fine. Just based on their design it was more intuitive as what to do. Soldered the tip and checked that I did not get the ground fibers touching the pin. Got it strung out late last night and what a difference. Was too late to get it up high very far but my signal meter on the R1000 was showing a very strong signal on each station received, something I had not seen before. Thanks to so many that stayed with me on this and offered their thoughts.
    Regards,
    Don

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