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Thread: UK Foundation regulations clarification required please?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    NR Exeter
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    6

    Default UK Foundation regulations clarification required please?

    I am not yet a license carrier but "hope springs eternal".

    The regs say Foundation licensees are allowed to OPERATE at ONLY 10 watts right?

    I am a little concerned that all, or at least most, foundation licensees are breaking the rules every time they log into a repeater.

    I have been unable to find a repeater that operates at ONLY 10 watts, So, by OPERATING a repeater at more watts than 10, they are OPERATING at well in excess of ONLY 10 watts right?

    Does this not break the rules and if not please show me the clause in the regs that says this practice is acceptable for a foundation licensee?

    Please someone clarify this question?

    Larry

  2. #2

    Default

    No, they're not breaking the rules. It's perfectly OK for a Foundation Class licence holder to use a repeater.

    The repeater has its own licence that states what its operating group can and cannot do when it comes to its output power. The terms of your licence do not apply to the repeater. If I transmit a general call through my local 70cm repeater, I would say something like "This is G0CCX, listening through GB3LR" rather than calling CQ and using just my call sign, as I'd do on simplex. Once contact was established with another station, I'd use just my callsign. Both stations are well aware that they're using the repeater, of course and that they are effectively 'piggybacking' on the repeater's licence.
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  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    NR Exeter
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    Default

    OH, great.

    Thanks for the clarification.

    Larry

  4. #4

    Default

    The important thing to remember with repeaters is that THEY do the work, you transmit with your available power, the repeater then retransmits it - it is doing the work.

    The licence relates to your amateur station, which is what gets the callsign - callsigns are never the operators but are the callsign the operator uses when using their station. This applies to all Government issued callsigns - aeroplanes, ships, maritime shore stations, etc. Your station, if tested, just needs to be within the power specified in the licence. There can be no clause in the licence, because you don't have the remote transmitter licence.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator pmh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Bury, Lancashire
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    637

    Default

    Just a few additional bits of information. Some frequencies are restricted to 1W. However, I very much doubt you will use these.

    In addition, it is 10W at the aerial so, if you know the coax you are using, you can calculate the losses along its length and adjust your power output accordingly.

    Kind regards,



    Phil

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