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Thread: Kenwood TS-130s

  1. #1

    Default Kenwood TS-130s

    I recently purchased a used Kenwood TS-130s and I am having audio trouble. Whenever I turn the VFO dial, i get periodic tones of changing pitch just as though i was passing a carrier every 200khz or so. The problem persists on all bands even with no antenna connected. My other radios do not pick up this carrier-like noise so it is clearly in the radio itself. Can someone please tell me what is going on and possibly how to correct it? In between the annoying pitches the radio seems to receive properly on both side bands. Please help!!!

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    Hello Brandon,

    On your Kenwood TS-130S there's a pair of Controls that labeled MIC & CAR, the Carrier (CAR) Control is set fully Counter Clockwise which turns the Cal (Calibrator) On. Turn that Outer Control to the 12 O'clock Position and the mysterious Carrier should Disappear.

    I'm surprised that you don't have a Owner's Manual for that Kenwood Transceiver. If you need one then go to the mods.dk website and enter your callsign and a Passwood.

    http://www.mods.dk/manual.php Once you're accepted go back to the main page and look for the Kenwood name, take your mouse and click, scroll down the webpage till you find the TS-130S Owner's Manual and Save that to your computer.

    Dan
    WA9WVX
    Last edited by WA9WVX; Thu 6th Oct 2016 at 03:38.

  3. #3

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    Thanks.
    I ended up calling a tech because this issue persisted regardless of whether the CAR knob was clicked to calibrate. It turns out that there had been two cables on the RF board (one being for crystal calibration) in the wrong sockets (gotta love buying "modded" radios). A quick swap cleared the issue right up. The tech i phoned was from a company called AVVid. This guy was able to walk me thru the diagnosis and repair while holding up an antenna mast!!! Very grateful for everyone's help! Thanks!

  4. #4
    K7KBN's Avatar
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    When the symptom is a recurring signal (especially every 100 KHz), my first question is "Does your receiver have a "100kc marker"? If so, turn it off."

    With modern HF transceivers, though, that's probably a procedure involving at least a dozen menus instead of one on/off switch.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  5. #5

    Default Kenwood TS130

    Hello ... I have two kenwood ts130s. Neither work. I have heard that these models have a problem with solder not connecting. I have taken a board out but the solder looks OK. Is there something I should look for in the case of a bad solder joint? George K3SZZ

  6. #6

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    These are great radios. Their biggest (and probably only) downfall is an undersized band switch that likes to make intermittent contact with age. If that is your problem, it will likely manifest itself in the beginning as a display problem as the counter only handles the kHz side of things ~ the band switch tells the display what goes to the left of the decimal point, not the counter board! This can usually be solved with some very careful contact cleaning and adjustment. Be careful when adjusting the contacts tighter, they easily bend too far so if the band switch suddenly stops turning, DON'T FORCE IT, they are hitting as they turn past each other! Carefully ensure proper switch rotation before closing the radio up if you do that.

    Could you describe your problem a bit more?

  7. #7

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    Hello to everyone,
    I am a new HAM, and purchased one of these radios from a guy in Dillon Montana a couple months ago.
    Many times, although not every time, that I check in to a net or answer a CQ, those on the receiving end of my signals tell me that I'm "off frequency" by a KHz or two, and it's usually to the high direction.

    Example: this morning I checked into the Early Bird Net run by KE7RTV in Sparks,NV on 7.185.5 MHz.
    Both he, and another on the Net told me that I was actually transmitting on 7.185.9 or "very close" to 7.186.

    This problem does not always manifest itself, but it does enough so that I'm thinking I should do something about it.
    However, I don't know how I'd troubleshoot this issue, or what steps I could go through to get it TX'ing more properly.

    Any and all advice and help will be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks in advance!

    Zechariah Hampton W7ORW Sheridan Montana

    W7ORW

  8. #8

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    The RIT function isn't on when you tune in to the net is it?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by brandon lind View Post
    The RIT function isn't on when you tune in to the net is it?
    Yes. Yes it is!
    Please elaborate!

    W7ORW

  10. #10

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    RIT stands for receive independent transmit. It allows you to change the receive frequency while keeping the transmit frequency unchanged. It is useful for when someone keys up off frequency so you can hear them without messing up your own tx frequency to rx it.

    The only time you should have RIT activated is when you are already on frequency but need to tune in someone who is not. Turn off RIT so the red light os not on, then use the VFO to tune into the net.

    If the RIT is on and the RIT knob isnt centered, the RX will be different than the TX. Always use the VFO with RIT off, then activate RIT to clarify people in once on frequency
    Last edited by brandon lind; Mon 17th Jun 2019 at 18:16.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by brandon lind View Post
    RIT stands for receive independent transmit. It allows you to change the receive frequency while keeping the transmit frequency unchanged. It is useful for when someone keys up off frequency so you can hear them without messing up your own tx frequency to rx it.

    The only time you should have RIT activated is when you are already on frequency but need to tune in someone who is not. Turn off RIT so the red light os not on, then use the VFO to tune into the net.

    If the RIT is on and the RIT knob isnt centered, the RX will be different than the TX. Always use the VFO with RIT off, then activate RIT to clarify people in once on frequency
    Wow!
    Thank you!
    This is the first time I've heard this!

    I'll check in to the Net tomorrow morning and see how it works!

    I truly appreciate your explanation!



    W7ORW

  12. #12

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    No problem! Just remember, the VFO changes the RX and TX, whereas RIT only changes RX.

    Let us know how it works!
    73!
    KE0KOY, Brandon

  13. #13
    K7KBN's Avatar
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    Originally, way back when solid state was still liquid, RIT stood for Receiver Incremental Tuning. Early ham stations involved a separate transmitter and receiver. If you answered a CQ, you tried to zero beat your transmit frequency to that of the CQing station. If he could hear you, he'd use his BFO control to his liking as far as pitch goes. Leave your RIT control off until you're in QSO. If necessary, turn it on and clarify the voice or bring the code to a comfortable pitch.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by K7KBN View Post
    Originally, way back when solid state was still liquid, RIT stood for Receiver Incremental Tuning. Early ham stations involved a separate transmitter and receiver. If you answered a CQ, you tried to zero beat your transmit frequency to that of the CQing station. If he could hear you, he'd use his BFO control to his liking as far as pitch goes. Leave your RIT control off until you're in QSO. If necessary, turn it on and clarify the voice or bring the code to a comfortable pitch.
    Thanks!

    W7ORW

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