Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Anomalous propagation across HF range, 11 August, 2015

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Near Dayton, OH
    Posts
    14

    Default Anomalous propagation across HF range, 11 August, 2015

    Did anyone else notice an anomalous propagation event on 11 August, 2015? From my QTH in SW Ohio, I worked 4 stations on 10 M SSB in New York/New Jersey and heard many beacons in the 1 and 2 call areas. This is stuff I never hear from here. I started hearing this around 1800Z and it continued past 2000Z.

    Unfortunately, I didn't have the presence of mind to record the beacons I heard. I did, however, tune to the NCDXF/IARU Beacon network, and was able to hear the 4U1UN beacon clearly down to the 100 mw tone on all 5 bands, 20-10 meters. I couldn't hear any of the other DX beacons as far as I know.

    I had one QSO on 17 M CW at 1814Z with a station in Rockford IL, 315 statute miles northwest of here. Very short propagation, but he faded out at the end.

    Then I tuned to 10 meters, noted all the beacons, and tuned to about 28.385 and heard two New York accents talking, one mobile. I broke in, and learned they were both on Long Island, using line of sight propagation. As we were talking, I heard a station in New Jersey calling. I assumed the guys on Long Island could hear him as well (isn't that line of sight?), but they couldn't. One station whose call I didn't get said he received me equally well on various antennas: vertical, dipole, inverted vee. Made no difference--all 58 signals. I QSY'd off the frequency with the New Jersey station and we talked for a while. As I signed with him, I got another call from a station in western New York state, near Rochester.

    These QSOs were between 350-600 statute miles on 10M SSB, in mid afternoon. All signals were rock solid, armchair copy. No QSB of flutter of any kind, and the anomalous conditions lasted well over 2 hours. My antenna is a vertical, with a very low radiation angle, so there is no chance we were using ionospheric reflections. I believe there was a long cold front between me and the east coast, stretching from well into Canada to somewhere around the Mason-Dixon line, moving east. That must have set up a tropospheric duct of some kind that allowed the radio propagation we were using.It was very cool.

    Any one else see this event, or care to comment?

    Ed
    W8BFT
    Last edited by W8BFT; Thu 13th Aug 2015 at 03:26.

  2. #2
    M0TTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire, England
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by W8BFT View Post
    Did anyone else notice an anomalous propagation event on 11 August, 2015? From my QTH in SW Ohio, I worked 4 stations on 10 M SSB in New York/New Jersey and heard many beacons in the 1 and 2 call areas. This is stuff I never hear from here. I started hearing this around 1800Z and it continued past 2000Z.

    Unfortunately, I didn't have the presence of mind to record the beacons I heard. I did, however, tune to the NCDXF/IARU Beacon network, and was able to hear the 4U1UN beacon clearly down to the 100 mw tone on all 5 bands, 20-10 meters. I couldn't hear any of the other DX beacons as far as I know.

    I had one QSO on 17 M CW at 1814Z with a station in Rockford IL, 315 statute miles northwest of here. Very short propagation, but he faded out at the end.

    Then I tuned to 10 meters, noted all the beacons, and tuned to about 28.385 and heard two New York accents talking, one mobile. I broke in, and learned they were both on Long Island, using line of sight propagation. As we were talking, I heard a station in New Jersey calling. I assumed the guys on Long Island could hear him as well (isn't that line of sight?), but they couldn't. One station whose call I didn't get said he received me equally well on various antennas: vertical, dipole, inverted vee. Made no difference--all 58 signals. I QSY'd off the frequency with the New Jersey station and we talked for a while. As I signed with him, I got another call from a station in western New York state, near Rochester.

    These QSOs were between 350-600 statute miles on 10M SSB, in mid afternoon. All signals were rock solid, armchair copy. No QSB of flutter of any kind, and the anomalous conditions lasted well over 2 hours. My antenna is a vertical, with a very low radiation angle, so there is no chance we were using ionospheric reflections. I believe there was a long cold front between me and the east coast, stretching from well into Canada to somewhere around the Mason-Dixon line, moving east. That must have set up a tropospheric duct of some kind that allowed the radio propagation we were using.It was very cool.

    Any one else see this event, or care to comment?

    Ed
    W8BFT
    Why wasn't it sporadic E? The distances look right for a single hop.
    73
    Andy

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Near Dayton, OH
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Well, sporadic E might be a possibility. I'm not an expert on propagation effects, but everything I've ever read talks about sporadic E affecting frequencies at 10 meters and higher. This was active throughout the HF spectrum; I saw its effect down to at least 14 MHz. I have no idea what was happening at higher or lower frequencies. That's why I'm asking if anyone else saw something similar at the time.

    The signals I heard were very clear and crisp. They sounded local. There was no hint of multipath smearing or other audio effects I usually associate with the "DX sound".

    I don't know what is was, so I'm looking for ideas.

    Ed
    W8BFT
    Last edited by W8BFT; Thu 13th Aug 2015 at 15:11.

  4. #4
    M0TTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire, England
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Sporadic E hops are evident from as low as 20m, it's just that short skip on those bands never gets anyone too excited unlike the higher bands. Es prop has been very good over the last few days in the US according to threads on QRZ.com. Almost any antenna with power as low as you can manage will get you real 59 reports when Es prop is there, and not often mentioned but besides the usual summer Es season, there is a brief period around mid winter when they can pop up.
    73
    Andy

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Near Dayton, OH
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks, Andy. That certainly helps clarify things. I rarely see short skip myself, because my normal antenna for 20 meters and higher frequencies is a vertical--actually a vertically mounted dipole, not a ground plane antenna--that apparently has a very low angle radiation pattern. I just recently re-entered ham radio after a multi-decade absence, and I have a lot of cultivating to do on my antenna farm. A hex beam is about 3d on the list of projects. By the way, nice airplane pictures on your QRZ page.

  6. #6
    M0TTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire, England
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Plane snaps, thanks.
    Here's one close to your heart :-)
    73
    Andy

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Near Dayton, OH
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M0TTB View Post
    Plane snaps, thanks.
    Here's one close to your heart :-)
    Absolutely! An H model, with the current paint scheme, assigned to the 23d Bomb Squadron at Minot, ND. My first squadron. Do you have a high enough resolution version of that picture that you can read the serial number (big black four-digit number just below and behind the co-pilot's window). The first digit should be either 1 or 0. It also might be readable on the tail, below the "MT" tail flash.
    Last edited by W8BFT; Fri 14th Aug 2015 at 17:07.

  8. #8
    M0TTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hertfordshire, England
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Yep it's 0005 and has 5th Bomb Wing written over the aircraft.
    73
    Andy

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Near Dayton, OH
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Andy--

    Thanks. To my knowledge, I've never flown that particular aircraft. It's the one, assigned to the 23d Bomb Squadron, that the 5th Bomb Wing commander flies. The 23d and 69th Bomb Squadrons are both part of the 5th Bomb Wing (the 23d was the only bomb squadron when I was there in the 80's). Both squadrons have the "MT" code on the tail (for Minot), but the 23d has a red tail stripe (Bomber Barons) and the 69th has a black tail stripe. I sent a much more detailed history to the email listed on your QRZ page. In case you're interested.

    Ed
    W8BFT (B-Fifty-Two)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •