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Thread: Learning CW / Morsecode - Software & Weblinks

  1. #1
    Administrator M0TZO's Avatar
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    Default Learning CW / Morsecode - Software & Weblinks

    OK, so please post your Software & Weblinks for learning CW/Morsecode.

    I am especially interested in Windows PDA or Mobile Java software, but also lets not forget the online stuff, Windows, Mac, Linux variations as well.

    Please include Price (or whether sahreware, freeware, etc) and Full link (no tinyurls, etc) in your post.
    Paul, MØTZO - my websites
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  2. #2

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    Hi Paul

    You might check out my site if you haven't already...
    There you will find PPCMorse (a morse code trainer for PocketPC / Windows Mobile PDAs) as well as a links section which includes a listing of ham radio links to CW/Morse PC software.

    http://www.n0hr.com/hamradio/25/10/ham_radio0.htm (PC CW training software)

    I hope this helps.
    73
    Pat NØHR
    http://www.n0hr.com

  3. #3

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    Hi M0TZO

    you can also have a look here for many morse code training programs

    http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Software/ ... _Training/

    There are several links to pda or pc software for self training or cw decoding.

    73
    Athos

  4. #4
    Administrator M0TZO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Learning CW / Morsecode - Software & Weblinks

    Saw the G4FON post had some posts today, so I am adding here something which is helping me.

    I am picking up more letters using the Chuck Adams, K7QO lessons.

    • Google Search "k7qo & ISO" google.com/search?q=k7qo+iso[/*:m:23rbnqhe]
    • Load files onto you iPod/MP3 Player.[/*:m:23rbnqhe]
    • Listen at your own leisure to the lessons. I listen to on bus & train every couple of days on way to/from work (not every day though)[/*:m:23rbnqhe]
    • If you can have pen & paper ready[/*:m:23rbnqhe]


    One tip I can give is convert files to AudioBook if using an iPod Free converters can be found online. This will mean you can pause and return to same point later, and they aren't included in music folders, and shuffles.

    ISO file I used was about 140Mb download. So not exactly small, but well worth it.
    Paul, MØTZO - my websites
    Please PM me if you wish to change your username to your callsign

  5. #5

    Default Re: Learning CW / Morsecode - Software & Weblinks

    A while ago... probably like 15 years. Not sure really. I bought this device to help me learn code. Used it for a while but other things demanded my interest more at the time. I do not have directions for it, but was wondering if anyone knew what it is and if you had directions for it.




    There are no names or numbers on the unit other then what you see here. It runs on a 9 volt and is about 2 1/2 9 volt diameters in length. Picture could be better. That blue knob on the far right is the last thing on this unit. Not big at all. Fits in shirt pocket while I drive

    To run you need to push the buttons in a certain order. Pushing B1 once, B2 once and B3 once apparently goes through the code letters, numbers and some others like break, period and comma. Pushing B1 twice speeds things up as well as pushing it more then twice. Not sure about the other two buttons though.

    Anyone ever see this? Works GREAT. No idea how it survived. I had recently moved and it was recently discovered by the wife who had no clue what it was....almost made it to the garbage.

    Michael Schaap

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    Default Re: Learning CW / Morsecode - Software & Weblinks

    This is the one I've had most success with.
    David

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    Being an avid programmer in BASIC for over 20 years releasing all my efforts as Freeware, there is a free collection of Morse Trainers of mine and those produced by others at

    http://www.sigord.co.uk/ZIPS/HERC Progs.zip

  8. #8

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    Being an avid amateur programmer for over 30 years using various BASIC all being freely available to all there is a collection of Morse Trainers by me and others at

    http://www.sigord.co.uk/ZIPS/HERC Progs.zip

  9. #9

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    G4FON's Koch trainer at http://www.g4fon.net/CW%20Trainer.htm has a proven track record. I have used it in class and it works.

    The greatest threat against learning the code is the student's lack of perseverance and sudden loss of interest Make no mistake, it IS time consuming. But at a pace of two characters per week and 2 hours of training at home anyone should be able to make it. Suggested code speed is 15 WPM. Slow enough to be easy to manage and fast enough to use it on the band later. Training with friends and a bit of peer pressure does wonders

    /Micke

  10. #10
    Super Moderator G6NHU's Avatar
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    There's the Learn CW Online (LCWO) site here: http://www.lcwo.net which uses Koch and it's what I'm currently doing, albeit slowly.

  11. #11

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    Didn't know about LWCO. Seems like a serious site. I especially like that it uses 15 WPM immediately. That IS the way to go! (I feel sad about the poor souls that have been taught morse at 5 WPM. It is not really learning the code and it is not useful on the bands either)

    One can argue against using the keyboard for reception however. If you already know typewriting by heart then I imagine using the keyboard for learning the code would be ok. For the rest of us using a pen would be much simpler. Or it would be like learning the code AND typewriting at the same time. One of them is tricky enough on its own...

    For initial transmitting exercises I recommend using a traditional key and not a bug for much the same reason. When using a key you use more muscle groups and take a more active physical part in the rhythm of the code, which I have found to be beneficial for the learning curve.

    /Micke

  12. #12

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    As a complete neophyte, is it safe to assume that I am best off using the Koch method to learn at 20wpm?

  13. #13

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    I'm sure glad I learned the code in 1957 before "websites", "software", "Koch" and "Farnsworth" came into the picture. I had to learn it because I wanted to be a First Class Scout (BSA). It was a requirement; case closed. Two years AFTER I learned it on my own, listening to shortwave stations, we got an assistant Scoutmaster who taught us sound, flashing light, semaphore and flaghoist. I picked up some pointers from him, but I still learned it myself, the old-fashioned way.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  15. #15

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    I learnt CW back in 1984/5. Having held a VHF only Class B License for a few months, I bought myself a Yaesu FT101ZD that I could only look at and listen to - as a motivator! The old Acorn BBC Microcomputer had a CW training course programme, so I printed out the BASIC code and rewrote it for my Commodore 64. Great for starting, as it would send groups of random letters and/or numbers, and it definitely got me going. But what really did the trick was listening to the slow speed CW transmissions organised by the RSGB - real words!

    The combination got me up to around 15 WPM, so I took the UK's Morse Test at North Foreland Radio Station with a small group of amateurs. The examiner started us off receiving at about 6 WPM - and stayed there! He then got us to individually transmit back what he'd just sent. A pretty easy test, and no surprises that we all passed. I kept up the speed for a while but, with no disrespect to those who enjoy CW and are brilliant at it, it was never that interesting for me. I saw it more as something that had to be done to get the Full HF Class A Licence - perhaps perceiving that the Amateur Radio world as a whole would see it as less important as time went by.

    Bottom line for me. Computers are OK (and I've no doubt that modern apps are way better than the apps of 30 years ago) but I don't think anything will ever beat real hand-made CW for learning. I might have a go at it again - just for fun!

    Slightly OT: I'm a pro musician, and I'm sure that being able to create and follow rhythms helped with CW. Any other musicians found this?
    Current radios: VHF/UHF: 2 x Baofeng 2/70 Handhelds. VHF: Kenwood TR9130 2m multimode. HF: Kenwood TS930S-AT
    Home antennas planned: G5RV / G7FEK / end fed wire. 1/2 wave vertical for 10m. 6 element beam for 2m. Vertical collinear for 2/70
    Website for the 'day job': www.andrew-gilbert.com

  16. #16

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    I have a question.I started learning cw using the K6RAU code course,i was doing good,but its very slow at 5 wpm.then i switched over to using the koch method at 21wpm and now it messed me up.
    On the koch method,im having trouble copying and writing the characters down on paper as fast as im hearing them.to begin with,im a slow writer.
    The question is,will my speed of copying get faster the more i practice?one friend told me, as i get better i wont have to copy every single letter,that i will listen for the words.

  17. #17
    K7KBN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyG0CCX View Post
    Slightly OT: I'm a pro musician, and I'm sure that being able to create and follow rhythms helped with CW. Any other musicians found this?
    Several years ago, this city, Bremerton WA, celebrated its 100th birthday. The Bremerton Symphony commissioned a short musical piece from a former Grade School/High School music teacher. He (poor guy!) tried to write notated music in the form of Morse code. This was to be played by the oboe over a very soft string tremolo. Unfortunately, neither of our oboists knew or cared about Morse code. What to do?

    I approached Amy, the principal oboist, and asked her if she had any student oboes that still sounded pretty good. She said she had two or three in good condition. Okay, I said. How about I buy a couple oboe reeds, you show me how to finger that high "D", and I'll play the Morse part. She agreed, and at the next rehearsal I played "BREMERTON 100" at about 15 wpm. The conductor and composer both were taken by surprise, seeing the principal percussionist playing an actual MUSICAL instrument!

    At the concert I sat with the oboes for the opening selection. The conductor bade me stand, and had my 15 seconds of fame.

    You can't transpose Morse code (dits and dahs) into music notation (notes, dotted and double-dotted notes and rests, etc) and have it come out right.
    73
    Pat K7KBN
    Semper ubi sub ubi.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by K7KBN View Post
    You can't transpose Morse code (dits and dahs) into music notation (notes, dotted and double-dotted notes and rests, etc) and have it come out right.
    Not precisely, though possibly near enough. There was a brilliant UK comedy 'Some mothers do 'ave 'em', starring Michael Crawford, who went on to great success on Broadway and the West End. If you write that title out in morse you get:

    ... --- -- . -- --- - .... . .-. ... -.. --- .- ...- . . --

    Musically, (allowing for the occasional rest), you get this:




    Note to moderators - we can go back on topic now, I hope I haven't strayed too far - but I'd allow it where I'm a mod!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by AndyG0CCX; Tue 19th Jul 2016 at 20:46.
    Current radios: VHF/UHF: 2 x Baofeng 2/70 Handhelds. VHF: Kenwood TR9130 2m multimode. HF: Kenwood TS930S-AT
    Home antennas planned: G5RV / G7FEK / end fed wire. 1/2 wave vertical for 10m. 6 element beam for 2m. Vertical collinear for 2/70
    Website for the 'day job': www.andrew-gilbert.com

  19. #19

    Default Morse code training and Morse code practice Android apps...

    I have a couple of Morse code apps for Android on Google Play and Amazon Appstore, each sell for $1.49.
    You may find more information on these pages:

    http://www.kg9e.net/apps/AmateurHamR...seCodeTrainer/

    http://www.kg9e.net/apps/AmateurHamRadioPracticeKeys/
    Attached Images Attached Images

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