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  • KD5FQF's Avatar
    Today, 02:07
    Greetings!!! Have been on somewhat of a amateur radio hiatus over the last 15 years or so... Recently dusted off my Icom IC-718 HF rig and have been trying to patiently work 20 meters through recent torrid band conditions with my portable MFJ-1621 (black box vertical antenna). Works well considering... I also have an MFJ-1622 apartment coil vertical antenna that I never used since taking the hiatus. Now I realize the 1622 has historically not gotten the best reviews, but I am determined to remember how to properly tune this beast and starting working 20 meters on it as well. I have no antenna analyzer or tuner. Just using the SWR meter on my 718 and checking the SWR while on RTTY mode @ 28 watts of power. Needless to say, it has been a headache this week trying to find the proper sweet spot on the MFJ-1622 for 20m with regards to the coil tap and counterpoise length and position. I can't seem to get any better than 2.75 to 3.2 : 1 on 20m. I used to use a Barker and Williamsson AP-10A back in 2000 on...
    0 replies | 29 view(s)
  • brandon lind's Avatar
    Today, 00:12
    Personally, I use a 220Ah Caterpillar battery with a Beleeb CL-C40 battery charger (not a smart charger). The charger makes absolutely no noise on any of my radios and the battery can take anything I throw at it. And when the power goes out, absolutely nothing at my desk changes. Linear regulators are definitely the cleanest, but hardly efficient. Switch-mode power supplies can be amazing if you find one that was built right. Buck-boost circuits can be extremely efficient and, if properly designed and filtered, will put linear supplies to shame. Good linear supplies can be just as hard to find too. Many of them have transformers that put out way too high voltage (because a higher voltage means smaller wire inside it for a given wattage) and the transistor has to work its butt off. If you pull 20A at 12v when the transformer (after rectification and under load) is giving the transistor 24v, the transistor is putting out (24-12)*20 = 240w worth of heat at the same current. The trick is to find a good linear...
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • K4CQO's Avatar
    Yesterday, 14:24
    Hi Berry, Check out the Ozaukee Radio Club (W9CQO), they are active and they are really nice guys. I was up there last year for a class reunion and stopped by one of their meetings. If you noticed, my call sign is similar (K9CQO) -- my dad's license was W9CQO and was donated to the club. I left the hobby for 50 years, and when I got back into it, I got a vanity call sign to honor my roots. Anyway, they are a great bunch of guys and joining the club is recommended. I am currently in GA, so I was only there for a visit. They also have a good monthly news letter that I enjoy reading. Regarding getting in contact from multiple states -- did you consider DMR? If just got a hot spot which uses an internet connection and you can select a talkgroup (area to communicate to) that is WI or West Virginia. With a hot spot, you can connect it to your phone as a hot spot (I know, multiple meaning for the same term) to go thru your mobile data plan. This would work in the 2 places that you travel to without having to...
    3 replies | 322 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:16
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rectifier
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:15
    PC Power Supplies do not offer enough rectification. They are a poor choice for a Linear Power Supply.. I have a RS35M here that was owned by a locally famous repeater builder, it was dropped, abused, left to rust in his basement. The meters fell out, the switch wore out, and yet when I plugged it in it still worked. Cost me double what it was worth to restore it, but now it sits on a shelf as a reminder to never take anyone at their word when they say - it works good, nothing wrong with it. Most good linear power supplies, when used as designed, will outlive two or three operators!
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • brandon lind's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:51
    Most (not all) PC supplies are a bit noisy and the 12v they output drops a little when keyed down on a ham radio, making them a bit low on the voltage side of things for most finals. I've killed several running car audio amplifiers on them. If you can crank it up to at least 13v and filter the kHz garbage out, absolutely. I bought a computer from cyberpower pc in 2015 and, well, they must have stiffed me on the power supply because this 800w 80+gold that cranks out 60A @12v shats all over my radio.
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • gnuuser's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:45
    I constructed my own by converting a 600 watt pc power supply ( there are many site that you can view on instructions to do this) with the silent cooling fans its reasonably quiet and provides a butt-load of power (about 44 amps)
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • gnuuser's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:35
    congrats on getting your ticket! Im looking for exam sites in my area and hope to get my license soon. I couldn't go just before the covid hit because i had just got out of the hospital from a pacemaker implant! there are online testing sites but you have to go through so much bull$#!t that its better to wait until a local test site is available. Im a firm believer in building your own equipment because you learn so much more about it. not to mention there are a lot of elmers out there who are more than happy to help. also learning morse all over again is fun.
    3 replies | 322 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 21:18
    Not quite sure what you mean by window? Car window, window on a house, what do you expect if you don't have the right antenna and are trying to receive inside of a building? Just guessing I would guess you live in an apartment building - steel reinforced concrete - which is hopeless The easiest antenna to deploy is a Discone, a discone is multibanded. You need coax, enough to go from the antenna to the receiver, and you need the proper connector for each end - I would guess the Discone would have a PL connector, so you could go with a RG 58 or Mini 8 type coax - check with your local cb radio shop for cable. Since you aren't transmitting on this antenna it doesn't matter if the coax is 50 or 75 ohms.
    3 replies | 94 view(s)
  • K6CPO's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 17:49
    https://www.hamradio.com/detail.cfm?pid=H0-003728
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • BlueScope819's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 14:27
    So I was just looking at amazon (By the way I figured out I need a BNC male antenna), would something like this work? https://www.amazon.com/Bingfu-Scanner-Magnetic-Compatible-Whistler/dp/B07X2LJ4HB It's $10, much less than your 150-300$, is there something in the spec that I am missing? It has the frequency range that I'm looking for, and most of the negtive reviews are because of the weak magnet on the base, which isn't a concern for me as it would be mounted in a windowsill. Thanks!
    3 replies | 94 view(s)
  • AC5PS's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 14:06
    You can buy air ban verticals you will probably find them online, I had one years ago. Or you can get a 2 meter “base” antenna for receive only. Both are going to be maybe 150-300 dollars. Good luck on your project and your PPL ! 25 year commercial pilot here, retired.
    3 replies | 94 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 11:48
    Astron RS 35M It is said that a 100w HF radio will draw about 22 amps and a 50w FM radio will draw about 10 - 12 amps. Since you can only transmit on one at a time,you can run both on this one power supply. Linear power supplies are at best about 75% efficient, so you need a safety factor, if you are going to run a 100w HF radio you need a power supply that produces at least 30% more power.. Avoid switch mode power supplies, they are cheap, but they are noisy and they aren't as reliable.
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • kjwhit's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 00:54
    Just took delivery a Yaesu FTM-400XDR and want to first use it in the shack. Looking for recommendations for a power supply. The radio at max draw pulls around 13 amps. I may want a power supply that would run a couple of mobile radios down the road.
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • gnuuser's Avatar
    Wed 1st Jul 2020, 00:38
    I use Peppermint 10 and have made extensive use of the armature radio section in synaptic package manager. almost any linux can download ham apps. But there are a few versions of Ham linux that are centered exclusively for ham radio. they are: (3 off the top ) andys ham radio linux, https://sourceforge.net/projects/kb1oiq-andysham/ and debian pureblend. https://www.debian.org/blends/hamradio/
    4 replies | 714 view(s)
  • BlueScope819's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 23:45
    First time ever on the forum and novice with radios, please don't flame me. I'm working on getting my private pilots certificate and currently I can't do any lessons because of COVID. My instructor recommended that I get a radio receiver, for the aviation freq range, which I was able to get from a friend. The model that I have is a IC-R10. I'm able to pick up the right frequencies for aviation with it, but I need to be within about two miles of the airport for the signal to be clear. From my basic understanding, antennas are designed for a specific frequency range and when you have a broad frequency antenna like I have with this, it's not very good at picking up certain frequencies. The aviation range is from 118 - 137 mhz, but I need to be able to receive 150mhz as well. Do you expects have any antenna options which are more powerful than this basic one that I could easily mount in say a window and would be comparable with this scanner / receiver? I have no idea what the standard is, but it's not...
    3 replies | 94 view(s)
  • brandon lind's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 23:18
    brandon lind replied to a thread Listening to repeaters in Yaesu
    Commercial broadcasting refers to a one-way communication to a broad spectrum audience with no expectation to receive a response. Commercial broadcaster stations use translators (aka broadcast relay stations) not repeaters. To make an association between the two is a senseless way to inject your negativity. And with your consistent hatred toward FM VHF and higher radio use, it shocks me you would even monitor your local repeaters to know they have been quiet for that long. People use FM on HF too. How the information is incorperated into a signal doesnt make its use in the hobby less valuable intellectually. Curious where you were going with that statement because it doesnt seem helpful to a question about repeaters. Just because you dont hear any FM stations doesnt mean you cant learn about FM. You dont need a QSO to learn. And cell phones didnt kill repeaters, there are still countless repeaters in use every day. Your hatred toward "walkie talkies" and anything non-HF is TRYING to kill repeater use...
    8 replies | 1027 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 22:11
    The only balanced antenna is a half wave antenna also referred to as a Hertzian antenna or a Di Pole. Full wavelength antenna is not balanced. Most verticals uses a form of stacking - ex Diamond X510 https://www.diamondantenna.net/x510series.html X510HDM Base Antenna Specifications:
    5 replies | 5670 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 22:04
    R2D2 replied to a thread Listening to repeaters in Yaesu
    Well - amateur radio isn't commercial broadcast radio, so just because there is a repeater there, doesn't mean that anyone uses it.. Where I live, the local repeater owner joined a group of repeater owners and linked 50 repeaters together, they call it the Wide Area Network - WAN repeater system.. I haven't heard a conversation on the wan in 6 months - since my cousin Tony Bologna moved to a rest home. Cell Phones killed repeaters! Might I suggest you do a web search - maybe city data dot com - for your area and find someone that is an active ham to tutor you. There isn't much you can learn from FM Communications where I live, most people don't even use their call signs anymore.. Simplex sounds more like cb radio than ham here..
    8 replies | 1027 view(s)
  • AC5PS's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 12:14
    AC5PS replied to a thread ARRL in history. in Clubs
    I had the pleasure of operating W1AW. FT-1000MP, 1000 watt amp Yaesu (don’t remember model) and a big beam. I started a pileup on 20M CW. I’ll never forget that.
    3 replies | 160 view(s)
  • kc5fm's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 04:32
    kc5fm replied to a thread ARRL in history. in Clubs
    ARRL is a non-profit organization, and was co-founded on April 6, 1914, by Hiram Percy Maxim and Clarence D. Tuska of Hartford, Connecticut. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Radio_Relay_League Definitely. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    3 replies | 160 view(s)
  • brandon lind's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 04:12
    brandon lind replied to a thread ARRL in history. in Clubs
    4/6/1914, definitely went back some years!
    3 replies | 160 view(s)
  • gnuuser's Avatar
    Tue 30th Jun 2020, 00:08
    gnuuser started a thread ARRL in history. in Clubs
    I knew the ARRL went back some years But today I found reference to it in a 1959 practical dictionary of electricity and electronics by R.L. Oldfield on page 3 (3rd entry from the bottom right of the page). Interesting find! I'll probably join the ARRL forum and let them know of the find.
    3 replies | 160 view(s)
  • K6CPO's Avatar
    Sun 28th Jun 2020, 18:48
    K6CPO replied to a thread Listening to repeaters in Yaesu
    this is probably the best explanation of repeater operation I have ever seen. This may help you in determining if you're doing anything wrong. http://www.alpinelakes.net/uploads/2/2/5/9/22591368/repeater-basics_jon-perelstein__1_.pdf
    8 replies | 1027 view(s)
  • M7NYH's Avatar
    Sun 28th Jun 2020, 10:47
    M7NYH replied to a thread Listening to repeaters in Yaesu
    guessing you are in the US because you refer to Technician licence i'm in the UK so YMMV - repeaters over here are ctcss tone to access ( to stop random transmissions o nthe input opening the repater) but they transmit without a ctcss tone , so if you have a recieve side ctcss set on a channel it's only going open the audio if the ctcss tone is present ...
    8 replies | 1027 view(s)
  • M7NYH's Avatar
    Sat 27th Jun 2020, 18:46
    M7NYH replied to a thread Handheld Radios Repeater in Amateur Radios
    I believe the standard in the UK is that toneburst access is still allowed but the repeater has to have CTCSS on the input , the output side of amateur analogue repeaters in the UK is without ctcss ... ( where commercial PMR will tend to be tone in and aobut for the limited security / lack of unwanted signals it is perceived to offer
    15 replies | 513 view(s)
  • R2D2's Avatar
    Sat 27th Jun 2020, 17:59
    R2D2 replied to a thread Handheld Radios Repeater in Amateur Radios
    The tones are coordinated by the area, for example, the western most portion of western pennsylvania and eastern ohio uses 103.5, the middle uses 173.8, the southern uses 123.0 or 131.8 - each section of the state uses a different PL. The PL is not mandatory but is suggested.. There are a lot of repeaters that doesn't use a PL because the repeater owner group is stuck in the 70's when the radios did not come with a PL board, so they are afraid if they run a PL they will lock out a small segment of their group. Or some silly notion that they can hear it and it degrades their audio. There are repeaters here that does not use it and when I key one I key 3 because my QTH is in a good location and can be received for 100 miles in all directions with the right band conditions..
    15 replies | 513 view(s)
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